Category Archives: Local History Room

Anything local history related

Gravestone of Edward Gray in Plymouth cemetery

In other spelling news

Gray’s Beach Park is named for Edward Gray, who arrived in Plymoth Colony in the 1642 and eventually became one of the the richest men around. He owned land along what later became Kingston’s shoreline, including as this notable land record,  the site of  Kingston’s little beach.

And we know it’s Gray’s with an A, because, yes, it’s carved in stone.

Gravestone of Edward Gray in Plymouth cemetery

This is Old Burial Hill in Plymouth, and Gray’s is one of the oldest marked stones there. The more legible of the two markers is actually a sign pointing to the original stone, which appears to be  in some kind of protective frame.  The related page on Find-a-Grave has some good modern close ups of the actual stone.

Source: The Jones River Village Historical Society Lantern Slide Collection IC4, series “The Pilgrim Story, Plymouth” 90 slides copyright A. S. Burbank, circa 1920.

Black and white photo of a fork in the road with a watering trough at the split

Watering trough at the Point

The Henry R. Glover Water Trough at the Point, Main Street and Summer Street, c. 1925
The Henry R. Glover Water Trough at the Point, Main Street and Summer Street, c. 1925

In 1888, Henry R. Glover, a wealthy manufacturer of mattresses and “curled hair” from
Cambridge, donated the “Henry Glover Watering Trough” to the town for public use at the Point, the triangular plot of land at the intersection of Main and Summer Streets. Glover was the son of Rev. Samuel Glover, a Baptist minister, who raised his family in the Samuel Foster House on Summer Street opposite the Point. The trough was a place for horses and dogs to drink after the town dismantled and covered the Point Well.

 

Source: Image from the Local History Room Image Collection IC7.

Black and white photo of a middle aged man with mustache

What a mustache!

Portrait of Fred Brackett, undated
Portrait of Fred Brackett, undated

The following is a portrait of Frederick G. Brackett (1854-1941). In 1889, he purchased the house at 126 Brookdale Street, built by the Chandler family around 1790, along with the sawmill located off Hall’s Brook just east of the house.

Brackett's Pond, mill yard, and sawmill, c. 1920
Brackett’s Pond, mill yard, and sawmill, c. 1920

Brackett continued to operate the mill (which burned down in 1924) and started a cranberry business with Samuel Lowe on the east side of Brookdale Street.

And he had an enormous mustache.

 

Sources: Images from the Local History Room Image Collection IC7 and the Emily Fuller Drew Collection MC16.

Happy Father’s Day

Norma Drew poised to jump from a tree stump to her father Clarence Drew
Norma Drew poised to jump from a tree stump to her father Clarence Drew, c. 1925

In honor of Father’s Day this weekend, here is a sweet moment captured by Kingston historian and photographer Emily Fuller Drew of her niece, Norma, jumping into the waiting arms of her father, Clarence Drew (Emily’s brother).

 

Source: Image from the Emily Fuller Drew Collection MC16.

June 1924

Group of children from the Center Primary School
Center Primary School students, June 1924

This photo from June 1924 shows an especially happy bunch of schoolchildren from the Center Primary School, renamed the Faunce School later that same year in honor of Walter H. Faunce, a former teacher, superintendent of schools, and town selectman.

 

Source: Image from the School Photograph Collection IC5. 

60 Main Street

Four people, two sitting and two standing, in front of the Elbridge G. Winsor house
Elbridge G. Winsor house at 60 Main Street, c. 1905

In this photo, a group of people (unidentified) appear to be enjoying the shade on a nice, sunny day.  One of the women is holding a small dog in her arms. They’re gathered in front of the Elbridge G. Windsor House at 60 Main Street, built around 1860.

 

Source: Image from the Delano Photograph Collection IC11.