Category Archives: Photos

Happy Father’s Day

Norma Drew poised to jump from a tree stump to her father Clarence Drew
Norma Drew poised to jump from a tree stump to her father Clarence Drew, c. 1925

In honor of Father’s Day this weekend, here is a sweet moment captured by Kingston historian and photographer Emily Fuller Drew of her niece, Norma, jumping into the waiting arms of her father, Clarence Drew (Emily’s brother).

 

Source: Image from the Emily Fuller Drew Collection MC16.

June 1924

Group of children from the Center Primary School
Center Primary School students, June 1924

This photo from June 1924 shows an especially happy bunch of schoolchildren from the Center Primary School, renamed the Faunce School later that same year in honor of Walter H. Faunce, a former teacher, superintendent of schools, and town selectman.

 

Source: Image from the School Photograph Collection IC5. 

60 Main Street

Four people, two sitting and two standing, in front of the Elbridge G. Winsor house
Elbridge G. Winsor house at 60 Main Street, c. 1905

In this photo, a group of people (unidentified) appear to be enjoying the shade on a nice, sunny day.  One of the women is holding a small dog in her arms. They’re gathered in front of the Elbridge G. Windsor House at 60 Main Street, built around 1860.

 

Source: Image from the Delano Photograph Collection IC11.

Black and white photo of a dirt road with trees. A house and a church are on the left side of the road

Seeing double

Seth Washburn House, corner of Evergreen and Summer Streets, c. 1865
Seth Washburn House, corner of Evergreen and Summer Streets, c. 1865

 

In the Local History Room we have a number of stereoscopic photographs, known as stereographs or stereoviews. These prints feature two nearly identical images, side by side, typically mounted on a 3.5-by-7-inch card. When viewed through a stereoscope, they create the illusion of a single three-dimensional picture. They were popular among commercial and amateur photographers from the late 1850s to the 1920s.

The three stereoviews featured here belong to a series called “Views of Marshfield and vicinity” by M. Chandler of Marshfield.

 

Main Street, looking south, c. 1865
Main Street, looking south, c. 1865

 

Thomas Hill, looking north, c. 1865
Thomas Hill, looking north, c. 1865

 

 

Source: Images from the Local History Room Image Collection (IC7).

Black and white photo. Three women, a man, and a dog standing in front of a large firewood pile

On this day in 1912…

Father, Mother, Annie, Grace and Lead on James Rickard’s wood lot, March 30, 1912

 

Here’s a snapshot taken 106 years ago. On the back, this image is captioned:

March 30, 1912
On James Rickards woodlot.
Father
Mother
Annie
Grace
Lead

According to census records for 1910, James C. Rickard owned a farm in Plymouth, where he lived with his wife, Lydia. The four people in this photo, however, remain unidentified.

Any ideas?

 

Source: Image from the Loring Photograph Collection (IC15).

A foul fowl?

Sometimes you come across an image that really makes you wish someone had written a caption. Here is one such photo.

With Delano’s Wharf in the background, we know that the photo was taken on the edge of Kingston Bay. The man stooped over the water resembles Charlie Delano (1837 – 1903) who fished and clammed in the area. But what is he doing with that bird? Catching it? Releasing it? Giving it a rinse? Added to the puzzle are the expectant looks from the four by-standers to the left.

Any ideas?

 

Source: Image from the Delano Photograph Collection (IC11).

Thanksgiving 1917

With Thanksgiving in just a few days, check out these negatives taken by noted Kingston historian and photographer, Emily Fuller Drew (1881-1950), on a freezing Thanksgiving Day in 1917.

Jones River at “the leaning tree,” Thanksgiving 1917

 

Curve of the Jones River, Thanksgiving 1917

 

Jones River “from the river path,” Thanksgiving 1917

 

Anchor Forge Dam
Anchor Forge Dam, Thanksgiving 1917

 

Source: Images from the Emily Fuller Drew Collection (MC16).

Cranberry harvest, Keith & Adams bog on Summer Street, October 1893

Cranberries

According to a recent article in the Kingston Reporter, 20% of American cranberry consumption falls during Thanksgiving week.

Our love for this particular fruit is certainly not new. This image of Keith & Adams cranberry bog on Summer Street dates back to around 1885.

Cranberry harvest, Keith & Adams bog on Summer Street, October 1893
Cranberry harvest, Keith & Adams bog on Summer Street, October 1893

Source: Image is from the Mary Hathaway Collection (MC21).