Category Archives: Town of Kingston

Shady green

Town House by Emily Fuller Drew, no date
Town House by Emily Fuller Drew, no date

 

Emily Fuller Drew captured what feels like the deep cooling shade of a summer afternoon in these two photos.  A familiar scene, yes, but the quality of the light makes something special of it.

 

Town Green and Civil War Soldiers Monument by Emily Fuller Drew, no date
Training Green and Civil War Soldiers Monument by Emily Fuller Drew, no date

 

 

Source: Emily Fuller Drew Collection MC16, negatives scanned by the Digital Commonwealth/Boston Public Library.

 

For more, visit the Kingston Public Library, and the Local History Room, and the full blog at piqueoftheweek.wordpress.com.

 

School Days

Getting milk in the lunch line, no date
Getting milk in the lunch line, no date

Ring ring goes the bell
The cook in the lunchroom ready to sell

Chuck Berry — “School Days”

For September’s lobby case exhibit, the Local History Room presents highlights from a great collection of photographs of Kingston Elementary School dating from 1952 to 1966.  These class portraits and candid shots were collected by Florence Esther DiMarzio, who taught at KES from 1920 to 1958 and served as principal for 34 of those 38 years.  In addition to 180 prints, the Local History Room has digital copies of another 20 photographs held in a private collection.

Grade Two, Mrs. Tuttle, 1960
Grade Two, Mrs. Tuttle, 1960

We haven’t identified everyone in the photos, so if you know who some of them are, ask for a photocopy, label the people you know and return it to the Local History Room.  We’ll put in their Permanent Records!

For more, visit the Kingston Public Library, and the Local History Room, and the full blog piqueoftheweek.wordpress.com.

Iconic Buildings of Kingston

Delano's Wharf block, 2001
Delano’s Wharf block, 2001

As part of the celebrations for Kingston’s 275th anniversary in 2001, the Friends of the 275th commissioned a set of blocks depicting eight iconic Kingston buildings: the old Town House, the Center Primary school (now called the Faunce School), the Pumping Station, the passenger station (now the restaurant Solstice), the First Parish Church, the Major John Bradford House, the now-gone Kingston High School, and Delano’s Wharf, shown here from the rarely seen bay side.

Red Cross swimming lessons behind Delano's Wharf, circa 1945
Red Cross swimming lessons behind Delano’s Wharf, circa 1945

The blocks, along with photographs from the Local History Room, as on display this month in the Library lobby.

 

For more, visit the Kingston Public Library, and the Local History Room, and the full blog piqueoftheweek.wordpress.com.

The eagle has landed.

G. Palmer Holmes and the World War II Honor Roll outside Town Hall, circa1946
G. Palmer Holmes and the World War II Honor Roll outside Town Hall, circa1946

Around 1946, the Town’s Honor Roll, which listed those Kingston residents who served in World War II, got an eagle. It was carved by Captain Fred Bailey, who fashioned at least two.

When the Honor Roll was taken down — it was replaced by the monument where Main Street crosses Route 3 — Holmes asked for the eagle.  It stayed in his family until very recently, when it landed here in the Library, to be cared for by the Local History Room.

thg-13-0001-lhr
Eagle, 2013

For more, visit the Kingston Public Library, and the Local History Room, and the full blog piqueoftheweek.wordpress.com.

Digging out

Brockton & Plymouth Street Railway Company snowplow, circa 1915
Brockton & Plymouth Street Railway Company snowplow, circa 1915

The trolley ran through Kingston from 1889 to 1928, and while the traffic definitely increased in the summer, the cars ran all winter too. In 1922, when the Brockton & Plymouth (successor to the Plymouth & Kingston and predecessor to the Plymouth & Brockton) owned the line, the rolling stock included three snowplow cars. One is shown here, scanned from a glass plate negative copy of an earlier photographic print.

Happy Birthday to the Reed Community Building!

Model New Community House, 1926
Model New Community House, 1926

Many thanks to Joe Colby, Head Custodian at the Recreation Department, for letting us know that today is the birthday of the Reed Community Building!  The photograph above appeared in The Civic Progress of Kingston (Memorial Press of Plymouth, 1926) and was accompanied by Sarah DeNormandie Bailey’s text:

And this summer the town is to receive as a wonderful birthday remembrance the crowning gift of a beautiful Community House, given by Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Reed of Worcester.  The Playground Committee must feel as if Aladdin’s lamp had been given to them and they had only to name a wish and have it granted. how many times have I heard their plans for a Community House and smiled to myself at the enthusiasm which could even dream of such a building, — and now it is all going to be true, only so much more and better than even the wildest dreams.  It is a proud and happy Mother Town which inspires a love in the heart of a son and daughter which lives through many years to blossom at last in a gift like this.

Below is the actual building standing proudly over the ball fields in its first decade.  Here’s to many more!

Reed Building, rear facade, circa 1935
Reed Building, rear facade, circa 1935

Historic places

Frederic C. Adams Library, view from the south, no date.
Frederic C. Adams Library, view from the south, no date.

 

This September. Wikimedia, the home of Wikipedia and so much more, is hosting a photography contest called Wiki Loves Monuments, featuring photographs of properties on the National Register of Historic Places.

Kingston has two buildings on the National Register of Historic Places: the Frederic C. Adams Library and the Major John Bradford House, as well as a National Historic District, which includes the area around Main and Green Streets.  For a listing of National Register sites in Plymouth County, and elsewhere, see Wikimedia’s list.

Major John Bradford house, rear view with well, 1921. By Emily Fuller Drew
Major John Bradford house, rear view with well, 1921. By Emily Fuller Drew