Tag Archives: business

Ye Kyng’s Towne Sweetes

Interior of Ye Kyng's Towne Sweetes candy store
Ye Kyng’s Towne Sweetes, Home Made Chocolates and Bonbons, Kingston, Mass., c. 1930

 

Around 1907, Carrie W. Hall and Sarah DeNormandie Bailey began a candy business called Ye Kyng’s Towne Sweetes, which they operated out of the house owned by the Hall family at 215 Main Street (below). Miss Hall managed the manufacturing, while Mrs. Bailey managed the sales. By 1910, they employed 8 women year round and up to 13 during the busy summers. Not only did they sell candy, but also other small items, like baskets or baby socks, made by Kingston women. They opened tea rooms in the two parlors.

 

Exterior of house at 215 Main Street, Kingston, MA
215 Main Street, 1972

 

In 1920, their growth necessitated moving to a second, larger location: the building which was previously George E. Cushman’s store at 193 Main Street (below). They sold their candies not only in this shop, but also in stores across Southeastern Massachusetts. During the time that Ye Kyng’s Towne Sweetes was at this location, Isaac and Dorothy Hathaway took over operation of the business.

 

Exterior of George E. Cushman's Store at 193 Main Street
193 Main Street when it was still George E. Cushman’s store, c. 1902

 

Ye Kyng’s Towne Sweetes closed sometime between the late 1920s and early 1930s, and the building was left vacant until George Cushman’s son, Charles, converted it into apartments.

 

Sources: Mary Hathaway Collection (MC21). Images from the Mitchell Toabe Papers (MC18), the Local History Room Image Collection (IC7), and the Jones River Village Historical Society Collection (MC29).     

 

Ted Avery’s Costume Shop

Ted Avery standing in the doorway of his costume shop
Ted Avery and The New England Costume Co., c.1948

While going through a box of photographs, I came across this striking image of Ted Avery, holding a mask in front of his face just inside the doorway of his costume shop on Summer Street. With Halloween just around the corner, it was too fitting not to share!

 

Source: Image from the Local History Room Image Collection (IC7)

New Old Business: Kingston Wants You!

There’s a lot of talk about Kingston’s business community these days, so here’s a look at efforts 50 years back to bring new business to town.

Published in 1965 by the Industrial Development Commission, this colorful pamphlet lays out the advantages of mid-20th century Kingston: a strategic historic location, efficient town government, fine schools, a well informed public, and more!

Kingston Public Library, Local History Room

Here’s the pdf version of Kingston’s Just Right for Your Plant Site.

Source: Town of Kingston Annual and Miscellaneous Publications TOK3

For more, visit the Kingston Public Library, and the Local History Room, and the full blog at piqueoftheweek.wordpress.com.