Tag Archives: Kingston

Little Free Library Logo

Little Free Libraries are Back!

With winter gone and warm weather on the horizon, Kingston’s Little Free Libraries are back up and running!  Looking for a good read?  Stop by one of the little free libraries and take a book!  Have a good book you’d like to share?  Drop it off in one of the libraries for someone else to enjoy!

What is a little free library?
A Little Free Library is a “take a book, return a book” free book exchange. They come in many shapes and sizes, but the most common version is a small wooden box of books. Anyone may take a book or bring a book to share. Little Free Library book exchanges have a unique, personal touch. There is an understanding that real people are sharing their favorite books with their community.

Where are the little free libraries located?
The Little Free Libraries are located in seven different locations around Kingston: Town Hall, Gray’s Beach, The Ah-de-nah,  The Police Station, The Reed Community Building, Sampson Park, and Kingston Intermediate School.  Libraries were built by the Silver Lake Regional High School Carpentry Program.

How can I donate books?
Donating books is easy!  Simply find one near you and place your donations inside!

The Little Free Libraries are a Kingston Community Fun project, a collaboration of the Library, The Adams Center, Council on Aging & Recreation Departments

Thank you, Kingston!

At the June 26th Town Meeting, residents voted to appropriate funds to create a plan for protecting and updating the library building.

A working group has been formed to oversee this project, and we’re excited to get to work. We’ll keep you updated on this page, through our newsletter, and through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Read on for an outline of what the project will do.

As you know, last December Kingston voters decided not to build a new library. In the months since then, library trustees and staff have held many discussions with town officials and residents about how to make the best, most efficient use of the building we have, and solve ongoing issues with an aging building designed for a smaller town and an earlier era.

We listened to the voters, we are considering all the suggestions that people have made — including some very creative ideas from our talented town officials and residents — and we’re ready to move forward.

To do that, we will need the help of an architect and engineers to turn those great ideas into a detailed, workable plan for the building. One of the articles on the June 26th Town Meeting warrant is a request for funds to create plans, drawings, and cost estimates — a practical plan to protect and update this aging municipal building, built in 1971 and remodeled as a library in 1994, and create a modern library Kingston can be proud of.