Tag Archives: Ponds

World Water Day

March 22 is World Water Day, a day to focus attention on the importance of water. In honor of the occasion, take a look at this selection of images of some of our local bodies of water.

 

 

Jones River

Silver Lake

View of Silver Lake from the shore
Silver Lake, 1924

 

Indian Pond

Boy in water and two people sitting in canoe on shore of Indian Pond
Indian Pond, 1925

 

Russell’s Pond

View of Russell's Pond from the South
Russell’s Pond from the south, 1923

 

Smelt Brook

View of lower Smelt Brook
Smelt Brook, c. 1925

 

Forge Pond

Porter Reed Tack Factory at Forge Pond
Porter Reed Tack Factory at Forge Pond, 1925

 

To learn more about Kingston’s rivers, ponds, and brooks, check out Places around Town.

For more information about World Water Day and this year’s theme—”Nature for Water”—go to worldwaterday.org.

 

Source: Images from the Emily Fuller Drew Collection (MC16).

Evergreen Cemetery Pond

Evergreen Cemetery Pond, 1876
Evergreen Cemetery Pond, 1876

 

84. Evergreen Cemetery Pond, 1876

Naturally a damp, spring spot. When cemetery was planned [in 1853], the spot was drained and curbed as shown. Later the pines were cut down or broke down from winter ice, and the spot was landscaped. Mr. Edgar Reed gave the granite seat on the north side of the pond.

 

Source: Text from Emily Fuller Drew’s lantern slide card file; image from Jones River Village Historical Society Lantern Slides IC4.  Scanned with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners and digitized at the Boston Public Library in conjunction with the Digital Commonwealth)

 

For more, visit the Kingston Public Library, and the Local History Room, and the full blog at piqueoftheweek.wordpress.com.

Fishing

Two boys fishing in the millpond of C. Drew & Co., no date
Two boys fishing in the millpond of C. Drew & Co., no date

This is Emily Fuller Drew’s copy negative of a panel card probably taken by someone else sometime earlier.  There’s not a lot more information about it: just two boys fishing in the pond that provided water power to C. Drew & Co., the long-lived Kingston tool manufacturer.  (There’s a great deal of information about C. Drew and their tools here).

Who were the boys? Who knows?  That’s not captured on any of the three versions of this image in the Local History Room. Yet, for all the identifying detail lost to history, there’s something painterly about the composition of the two figures and the texture of the image that abstracts it just enough to capture the hazy, nostalgic air of a hot summer afternoon spent fishing.

 

Sources: Negative from the Emily Fuller Drew Collection MC16 (scan federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners and digitized at the Boston Public Library in conjunction with the Digital Commonwealth)

For more, visit the Kingston Public Library, and the Local History Room, and the full blog at piqueoftheweek.wordpress.com.

Bryant’s Boxboard Mill

For almost 50 years, Sylvanus Bryant ran a mill located on Sylvia’s Place Road between Bryant’s Pond and Soule’s Pond in the Indian Pond neighborhood of Kingston.

Bryant's Boxboard Mill on Sylvia's Place Road, no date
Bryant's Boxboard Mill on Sylvia's Place Road, no date

As far back as 1721, several water privileges existed on Furnace Brook, Trout Brook and the man-made ponds that connect them.  Around 1810, the Anchor Works (which actually produced spades and shovels) operated on the site of Bryant’s mill. Later, Daniel Bisbee and Henry Soule ran a nail and tack factory there.    Next was Thomas Russell, who also produced tacks.  In 1856, Sylvanus Bryant Jr. and Noah Prince set up a sawmill to make boards for boxes.  By 1879, Bryant had bought out Prince; he continued to operate the mill until 1900.

Bryant's Pond, 1925, by Emily Fuller Drew
Bryant's Pond, 1925, by Emily Fuller Drew

This view, taken from the O.W. Stewart Preserve (part of the Wildlands Trust of Southeastern Massachusetts), shows some of the buildings around  Bryant’s Pond. In the left foreground stands a small boathouse, and behind it to the right is the Bryant Boxboard Mill. Behind the mill, the Lyman-John Cushman house and barn can be seen, along with a dirt road that is today’s Sylvia’s Place Road. At the far left is the Deacon Cushman House, which today is 33 Indian Pond Road.

Source: Life on the River by Carrie Elliott, 2005